Wednesday, 11 November 2009

Put the horse before the cart!

Bessler the crafty old fox, almost outwitted me again and then I remembered his advice in Maschinen Tractate - don't forget to put the horse before the cart! All the indications were there that I had it right, but I couldn't for the life of me understand why the weight wanted to move in the direction it seemed to be determined to move in! Then I noticed one of Bessler's little pet mistakes - not really mistakes at all but rather clues as to how the thing should be put together. Not that I hadn't seen the error previously - I once made a long list for my own amusement of all his apparent mistakes and came to the conclusion that every single one was deliberate - but I just couldn't come up with a convincing explanation for this one before today. As is always the case with Bessler's clues, when you see it you realise how simple they are, and wonder why you didn't see it before.

So. I wasn't going to give any more commentary on how things are going with the build, but I was so pleased with this discovery, I just had to share my glee with you. Well it's back to the work shop again.

There are a set of clues that I haven't published yet but which are, in many ways, more informative than the ones I have discussed on http://www.theorffyreuscode.com/. As I suggested above, look for errors by the inventor. They turn out not to be errors at all but clues as to how the machine was constructed. The trouble is, it isn't clear what they mean until you happen on the right design and then afterwards when its too late, the meanings become clearer.

Then there is the 'Toys' page, a collection of drawings which show you various details about the mechanism. 'A' for example shows the mechanism before it has moved, notice the horizontal lever mounted in a slightly off set way.

'B' shows the same mechanism but a different part of it - after it has moved.

'C' and 'D' show two clues each, not difficult to grasp. Each mechanism has one weight up and one down, and each also has two sets of levers somewhat in the form that you see them on the page.

'E' connects those two parts of the mechanism, which is why it falls roughly between the two.

Too much already!

JC

8 comments:

  1. Very interesting.

    I look forward to the denouement and I wish you all the best in your endeavours. I think one has to vote you as the student most likely to succeed. 8-)

    I will be interested to see if the working principle bears any resemblence to that of the Vesica Pisces Gravity Motor.

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  2. Thank you Frank. I may disappoint you if my design works, because it doesn't have anything of the Vesica Pisces in it. Having said that I am still puzzling over the apparent indications of a Vesica Piscis present in at least one and possibly two drawings by Bessler. At the moment I'm inclined to think it was intended as some kind of clue but it appears to contain conflicting pointers and I have decided to leave it to simmer at the back of my mind for a while.

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  3. Bessler really was a old fox. I am extremely curious to your design, John. Any (rough) estimate how much more work will be involved?

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  4. I should be finished well before Christmas and hopefully within two to three weeks. My ETAs have slipped by, I know, but I'm back on track now and finding the time to do the work, so I'm feeling more optimistic about fulfilling my prediction that Bessler's wheel would be built and working this year.

    JC

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  5. Endeavor to perservear..........this is the task at hand, the world will little note nor long remember what we say here but it can never forget what you have done here John. This work, this task, this challenge is the greatest event in current history, and the discovery of its solution will be forever linked to you and your great dedication

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  6. Thank you! I will continue to work towards a successful conclusion and whether or not the world remembers my contribution, I hope that my efforts, or someone else's, meet with success ssomewhere soon.

    JC

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  7. My goodness, John Collins. How will we ever forget you?

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  8. I meant, I hoped someone, anyone, would succeed, regardless of whether my efforts were remembered.

    JC

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