Monday, 16 May 2011

Bessler's wheel worked by simple mechanics - no fancy physics required.

Now that I know how Bessler's wheel worked it has become a source of some concern to me to see so many people trying promote their own theories about how it worked. There are as many pet theories out there as there are people, I think, and each is as certain as I am that we are right.

Most people agree that it cannot violate any known laws of physics, therefore we must have erred in some way or perhaps be missing some crucial detail about the way gravity works. Perhaps, others have speculated, we need to involve a second natural force such as CF, or ambient temperature variation or some other such extra piece of energy to help our wheel complete just one rotation. In fact it could not be more simple. There is indeed no need to call for some new kind of physical law or even a new interpretation of the existing laws, because Bessler's wheel worked quite readily, getting its energy from the force of gravity (via falling weights Trevor ;-)) with nothing more than the same understanding that we have all been taught. Karl understood that and that is why he was surprised that no one had discovered the solution before.

I know that we have all touched upon the solution and have moved onwards without considering how we might overcome any obstacles that appear to be insurmountable, and that in my opinion, is why Bessler succeed.  Having ruled out all other possibilities he returned to basics.
JC

33 comments:

  1. Good point John,let's keep it simple,there must be a point where law of physics stops and imagination takes over.

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  2. Congratulations, John. We're looking forward to a demonstration.

    I listened to the recording of your interview today; you gave a fine interview; just a couple of brief mental blanks.
    But when you and Royce discussed the possibility of a wheel being used in space travel, I thought how could a gravity wheel work in space, either for thrust or navigation? If the wheel is powered by gravity, once your spaceship is cruising along in space wouldn't a gravity wheel stop?

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  3. Sorry if I butt in here Doug,but we've been over this ground before.I proposed a gravity wheel for space which will work in exactly the same way on earth.
    The one that works in space would work on cenrifugal gravity.If you put two or three Bessler wheels on a hub.You then spin the hub up to one or two Gs.The outside diameter becomes the floor.Then you start the Bessler wheels to provide power to do work and also provide power to maintain the giro.
    I know John will agree with me that it's quite feasible.

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  4. John,
    do you believe bessler acted alone, or that a group who have known about the wheel, from times past, for some unknown reason decided to let the secret live, by hiding it in a clever way through print ?

    by the way, would you happen to be using a savonious type of spiral ?

    have your clues led to to the answer of the AP image ?

    P-47.

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  5. When Royce asked me about space travel for a Bessler wheel, I tried to put across a simple idea but I think it got lost in transmission.

    Take a dynamo for instance, the design is basically an electric motor in reverse. In a similar way, my thought was that if instead of having gravity drive Bessler's wheel, you drove it instead with an electric motor for instance, it should be possible, in theory, to produce linear thrust from a rotating wheel. This could be used to apply thrust to a space ship.

    I have no thoughts about centrifugal gravity although of course one could possibly design something along those lines.

    JC

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  6. Anon, I'm confident that Bessler acted alone. No I'm not using Savonius type spiral.
    I have provided my answer to the AP image on www.theorffyreuscode.com

    JC

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  7. Wouldn't it be more efficient to just drive the ship directly from the electric motor, rather than driving a wheel that would need gears to switch the rotational motion to linear thrust?

    I'm pretty sure that centrifugal gravity has additional forces not present in normal gravity. I'm not sure a gravity wheel would perform the same way in that environment. Centrifugal gravity has a gradient, it would be less near the axis, most at the rim. Much the same way normal gravity decreases the farther you get from the mass of the earth. So the weights in a wheel would actually lose weight at the top of a rotation. And the coriolis force, or the curve of a falling object in the space station, would be noticeable, depending on a couple things: the radius of the space station and how fast it would have to rotate to create 1 g. The bigger and slower the station, the better. The minimum radius would need to be about 980 meters revolving about 1 rpm.
    Here's a good write-up about artificial gravity on the space station in 2001: A Space Odyssey:

    http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2009-02/physics-artificial-gravity-part-two

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  8. Cool!..Perhaps more smaller Bessler wheels on a bigger hub.Well, the proof will be in the testing.
    At least it can be tested here on earth with a horizotal wheel.
    Now our problem is to get a vertical Bessler wheel working before anything else.

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  9. Interesting! It must, therefore, be something extremely simple, something that has been staring us in the face all along, and we dismissed it as impossible, impractical, or "unlikely". I wonder what that says about us - indoctrinated, perhaps, as we are, that it's pointless anyway, impossible, and therefore too futile to even try. I just can't shed the thought that it must be something involving a mechanical oscillator, swinging perpendicular to the system axis. I just can't wait to hear more about it! How long before you can disclose some more, oh Johnfyrreus? :-)

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  10. I've perfected one mechanism and the other four are half assembled so then I just have to fit them to the wheel.

    I hope to finish everything completely in the next two days or so, fitting in the work in between visiting my mother-in-law who is in hospital.

    Yes Andre, very simple. I promise you, you will all kick yourselves when you learn the secret. I just hope I'm right! I have never been as certain of any previous design as I am of this one today - never in my life before.

    JC

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  11. Re centrifugal gravity, i.e. a gravity field produced by some sort of centrifuge, I agree it has the gradient you mention, Doug. What's more, you can easily alter its overall magnitude, just by altering the rotational speed of the centrifuge.

    So you could have a weight "fall" in your Bessler wheel in a high magnitude field, then it could "rise" in a low magnitude field, and so on.

    I checked out that idea some time ago, but I only found energy swapping between the weight, Bessler wheel, and the centrifuge.

    I'm looking forward also to your disclosure, John.

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  12. I hope you are right John,and wish you success.

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  13. Is it turning?

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  14. Listen guys, I've said this many times now - I'll tell you when I've tested it, working or not. I have a busy life and time for the wheel is limited to when I can find the odd few minutes to work on it. When I know, you'll know pretty soon after.

    JC

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  15. I hope your new inspiration leads you to success.

    Axel

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  16. James (Primemignonite)20 May 2011 at 07:37

    John, you may have had a slight mis-fire or two from times before but, I for one am sure that THIS time, it will of it's own self GO!

    Think of it all as-summed: the sheer force-of-will now amassed for it is a thing grown gigantic, the time being right perfectly, all according to direst need; the demand for release from dependency upon fuels carbon-based, one never more palpable and so, on account of all this and far more not here accounted, surely IT SHALL come to be a kind of life, such as Baron Frankenstein's Monster did - LIFE, precious LIFE imbued into materials otherwise DEAD!!!

    (Given all this, as now realized and stated, how COULD it not, and in JUST such a way or at least similar?? At the prospect, the mind REELS!)

    Afterward, when this near-glory has once again shone forth, and now upon US ALL, doubtless-so it will be agreed generally by all, that NO LAWS by it were broken, and to this our best physicists will doubtless AGREE in loftiest giddation!

    If I may be allowed to take it upon myself to so-do, natural pre-congratulations for a Grand Success are offered by all!

    (Not much longer now . . .)

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  17. Can I get an Amen for brother James!

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  18. Amen Brother James.

    Axel

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  19. Stumbling in the dark!

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  20. The Bessler wheel should start turning this month.

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  21. Let me refrase that,..The wheel may(permission) turn this month!

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  22. One to go? I wouldn't be able to sleep without attaching that final one and trying it. You've got more patience than I would have John.

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  23. Doug,..When you've been on a project this long,it tends to become routine because you're aprehensive as to whether it is going to work or not!

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  24. You're right, both of you, but I have an other project which also takes up much of my spare time, although not so intensely. Sometimes the two compete for my attention.

    JC

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  25. Don't worry John,I know the feeling.That last mechanism,that last bolt.Savouring the moment in the hope that it will work,postponing it in case it doesn't.The more work that goes into it,the greater the disappointment.
    I don't do disappointment any more,I just take a break,switch off and start all over again.
    Anyway all the best.

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  26. Well, everyone is different I guess. Puzzling, though.

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  27. Not so puzzling in my opinion, Doug. I have so far traced my family tree back to approximately 1068 and that is starting with my father, who was a Polish noble. My great grandfather on my mother's side came from Belgium and most of her side of the family were Belgian, so add to that mix the Irish Wild Geese who roamed all over Europe in 17th and 18th centuries and were the original forethers which led to me, and you have an interesting mix of DNA. That is my other hobby and very time-consuming it is!

    JC

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  28. That's a long way back. My genealogy is Canada and US (parents) and England and Germany before that, but I haven't searched more than a couple generations. My grandfather was friends with Conan Doyle when he lived in London; that's why I'm a Sherlock Holmes fan.

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  29. And all of my grandfathers 3000 yrs ago were cavemen, so let's get on with the wheel. It must not be working or we'd be hearing about something else besides Polish nobleman.

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  30. Interesting John,..Did you also come over to Britain with William the conquerer in 1066.?

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  31. Apparently, (and this is still open to further research)my oldest confirmed ancestor was Gualtherus Boteler(Walter Butler)(born 1069, died 1135), first cup-bearer to King Henry I of England(William the Conquerors' fourth son) and recipient of the Tenth wine in the Kingdom of England, his office was known as "Boteler" which name his descendants passed on. Apparently he was married to Medidda, daughter of King Antiochus of Syria, who he brought home from his crusade to the promised land.

    JC

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  32. Okay,..Why I asked is because after the battle of Hastings we the Daunceys were given land as noblemen.My father comes from Stroud.
    I think it's interesting to relate our origins as it helps people to connect.

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  33. One of my ancestors was Theobald Walter. He was given the office of Chief Butler of Ireland, which was shortened to Butler and which name they eventually used. His original name, Walter or Walther, means 'army commander' so it is difficult to say what his original name meant as it too was a title rather than a name. But yes, Trevor, his father came over with William the Conqueror.

    JC

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