Saturday, 16 June 2018

Bessler the man versus his achievements.

When I began to publish information about Johann Bessler, I stuck strictly to the facts as I knew them then, so I included Bessler’s own comments about his life and feelings and emotions.  I also described the reactions of other people, not just their reactions to his claims, but as well, their impressions of Bessler the man.  These were important details to include, but to me, the most important facts were those relating to his wheels; the descriptions of them and the tests they were required to undergo; were the tests exhaustive, sufficient and carried out as well as possible given the times they lived in?

I believe they were as good as could be expected, given that Bessler did not wish to divulge the design concept.  He also had the benefit of Gottfried Leibniz's advice on the kind of tests he should arrange.  The tests do, in my opinion, provide the strongest evidence that Bessler’s claims to have discovered the secret of a machine which showed continuous rotation enabled by gravity.  They were absolutely genuine.

It does seem to me that some people on the forum are only now studying the mind of the man, rather than his works, to find fault with everything about him.  They suggest thst he was a showman, a conman, he told lies etc.  Those things are true but do not negate the other evidence.  We have no conception of how people survived in those days, there were no state handouts, no where to go for help and a man had to live on his wits just to find food and accommodation.  Once he had successfully completed the first part of his burning mission in life; to find the solution to perpetual motion; Bessler set about finding a way to publicise it.  His previous actions however morally dubious, do not necessarily mean that everything about him was unprincipled - he did what he had to do to survive.

So when discussions are taking place about the mind of the Bessler please make allowances for the times he lived in, his limited education and Leibniz’s opinion of him.  Leibniz was one of the cleverest and most accomplished men of the time and he called Bessler his friend and asked for people to make allowances for his manners as he had not been brought up to accomodate the correct etiquette of those far off days.

History  is full of accomplished scientists, inventors, authors and painters, whose works are widely admired, but most of whom had the usual human weaknesses.  Many showed personality disorders such as paranoia, dramatic, overly emotional or unpredictable thinking or behavior and manipulative, exploitative interactions with others.  But they were still admired for their accomplishments and Johann Bessler too, will be admires for his determination to find the solution to Perpetual Motion, once his machine has been proven.

JC

23 comments:

  1. I whole heartily agree John, after coming down his own path, in his own way and finally making this incredible discovery, it is not that difficult to imagine where his words are coming from. No One else had ever achieved what he achieved, and not just once but many times with different designs. His status should have been assured as one of the greatest inventors of all time. He did all the things that were asked of himself and his machine, he had the best minds of the day put together all of these tests and he passed them all. The jealous even went so far as to take him to court and prove that he was a fraud.... WHAT ON EARTH was he suppose to do? If we can make this thing work, and I know that we will, what are the next steps? After so much sacrifice and dedication anyone one of us would feel more than a little put off by lack of respect. It is the same dilemma that he was struggling with....Lo all those many years ago. The revealing of a work like this is a tricky slope. If we are not in a financial position just to give it away to the world with the click of a button on a release into the internet then we must find a way to capitalize on this discovery of all discoveries, at least in some fashion, just to maintain our sanity. Which obviously took its toll on him as well.....

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  2. I agree with John, and about Leibniz. I was doing a study of all the people involved in my book, and when researching their IQ, we find Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz up their with the greatest brains of all time, with an estimated IQ of 195 on a modern scale compared to our generation. I hope people would appreciate what such a friendship and what his support really means. Because, who on this earth today can raise above Leibniz, and start to criticize Bessler, when Leibniz took the time to knew him and didn't criticize him and his machine? Who would like to throw the first stone, so to speak?

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  3. I think there is just one thing that makes Bessler a suspicious character; smashing the Kassel wheel when he was about to sell his machine. I really don't get why he did such a thing.

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  4. I don't find Bessler suspicious at all. He just wanted compensated for his years of effort and sacrifice and tried to protect himself from those who wanted to steal the technology from him. He destroyed all of his wheels because the design was so simple a carpenter's apprentice could build it if he saw how it worked.

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  5. Karl convinced everyone that the wheel was genuine and very valuable. He was about to sell the wheel. Smashing the wheel is a very over the top reaction in those circumstances. I can only explain it, John also suggests this in this post, that Bessler had some kind of a psychological problem. Together with the intense pressure, it may have resulted in such an action, I don't know.

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    1. I remember commenting that Bessler always “smashed” his wheel prior to moving. I suggested that he used the move and it’s security requirement to take the wheel apart because out on the road he might be subjected to robbery and the theft of the wheel, as an excuse to use the word “smashed” rather than disassembled. This done so that he could lay the blame for the destruction on anyone or thing that had annoyed him in some way.

      I don’t know if this idea has any value but I offer it as a possible reason for an action which appears, on the face of it, well over-the-top.

      JC

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    2. I don't know John. Best explanation for me is that , as you said in the post, he was a human after all. I think, months of preparation, months of tests, countless arguments probably wore him down. Apparently, later, he regretted what he had done and called Gravesande for demonstrating his next wheel.

      I also agree with anon, selling the wheel is really hard when the secret is simple. It is hard even today. It must have put an enormous pressure on Bessler.

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  6. What would you all have him do with it? He's being booted out of the castle,
    which probably means he has lost what ever security he may have had and any chance to ever sell it. It's to big to move and would be difficult to take apart quickly and he can't very well go off and leave it there. Plus, once again he has to prove every thing, to another genius scientist, who thinks it's all a big fraud! So what else could he do? But what do I know, Sam Peppiatt

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    1. On contrary, he smashed his wheel. This is from Wikipedia:

      "... Peter the Great was interested in purchasing the invention and sought advice on the matter from Gravesande and others. Gravesande examined the axle of the wheel, concluding that he could see no way in which power could be transmitted to it from the outside. Bessler, however, then smashed the wheel, accusing 's Gravesande of trying to discover the secret of the wheel without paying for it, and declaring that the curiosity of the professor had provoked him."

      He was really in a good position. Karl's testimony convinced the skeptics.

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    2. If you say so------------Sam

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    3. Sam, I mean noone was booting him out of the castle.
      But of course, the pressure he had to endure was colossal. He probably thought after years of waiting, nothing would happen... That's my humble opinion :)

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    4. Excerpts from orffyre.com...

      Landgrave had invited Herr Professor Gravesande from Leiden to demonstrate to him the physico-mathematical experiments which were published in his book, and they fell into discussion about perpetual motion – whether Orffyreus’ wheel really was a true perpetual motion. The Landgrave asserted that it was, and ordered Orffyreus to demonstrate it to Herr Gravesande, but without telling him who Gravesande was. Orffyreus obeyed the order and demonstrated his machine in the presence of the Landgrave, but Gravesande asked so many questions and expressed such a keen interest in learning about its internal structure, that Orffyreus formed the opinion that they wanted to discover his secret, and therefore he refused to show them any more, and as soon as they had departed, he broke up the machine so that there would be nothing more to fear..

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    5. I doubt the excerpt reflect the real events Suresh. Because, it looks like Gravesande knew Bessler before the event in some degree. Probably from previous demonstrations. I am not sure but I deduce this from Gravesande's statements about Bessler and trust in him.

      It is important to note that from end of the Kassel demonstration to the smashing of the wheel, there were three years. In those three years, the wheel was in a room. So it sounds the secret was not that safe actually. He should have trusted Karl's men. From Bessler's perspective, it must have been a daunting situation.

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    6. Numbers really reveal a lot... For example take the number 13... You usually wouldn't find the thirteenth floor in a sky scraper or a hotel room numbered 13... One plus three makes four... An lucky number in numerology... A person born on a date numbering four is a highly misunderstood one... He will usually remain unlucky and alone... and odd too... This ill-luck affects all born on 4th, 13, 22nd & 31st in any month... important events or tragic incidents occur in such a person's life... For instance, he should refrain from shifting into a house numbering four or totalling four to avoid devastation in his life... Number eight is also said to possess ill-luck as it is double the four... Now, we are not very sure if Bessler was born on such a number but his life events reveal so... This can be easily confirmed from the important events in his life concerning the fate of his invention...

      Well, all is not that bad regarding four... Original and natural invention/discovery ideas occur in such person's mind...

      Believe it or not, but I have done extensive research on this number and found all the above to be true...

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    7. One plus three makes four... An unlucky number in numerology...

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    8. Bessler died on 30 Nov 1745...

      If the year 1745 is totalled we get 8(1+7+4+5=17 (1+7=8)...

      A person naturally becomes famous or enigmatic after his demise if eight results from his death date...

      Similarly, if 30-11-1745 is added we get 22 which becomes 4... A sudden and tragic death...

      All this amply go to prove that bessler's story is genuine and so is his invention...

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    9. Some major activities in Bessler's life has occurred on dates totalling to four or eight... Like moving into the sealed room or securily sealing the room with the wheel in motion inside by the distinguished examiners on such date...

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  7. RAF John,I see that climbing back up need not mean sliding, which introduces more friction than swinging and shifting. Does your concept use shifter and primary weights?

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    1. RAF, I’m not sure what you mean. But there are no sliding, parts. Your definition of shifter and primary weights may differ from mine.

      JC

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  8. MooieEnergie update in English
    http://www.mooieenergie.nl/en/uncategorized-en/newsletter-june-2018/#more-269

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  9. RAF John, By shifter, am thinking like a gear -shift action, with weight pairs at the ends of lever pairs. This lever action lifts the primary weight which weighs much more (as Bessler mentions in the high quotes).

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    1. Kind of but not as you describe. Sorry I can’t be more precise. As you will see in my next blog, all will be revealed soon.

      JC

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  10. Looking forward to your insights

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