Tuesday, 26 July 2016

Numerology and Alpha-Numerics in Das Triumphirende.

Here's another little coded example.  Please be aware that it has been abbreviated from my own writing and I have omitted some detail but the facts are there for anyone to check.

I noticed early on that there seemed to be an excess of numbering in the wheel drawings in Grundlicher Bericht and Das Triumphans. It looks as though some of the items are ‘over-numbered’.  By that I mean that Bessler seems to have labelled the parts with a particular number more than seems necessary.  For example the main pillar supporting the wheel is numbered 4, three times.  The slimmer pillars are numbered 12, and two of them to the left are numbered twice each, and the other two are only numbered once each.   

Some numbers appear more often than others and not just because they are attached to more similar pieces. After number 18 the rest of the numbers are lone examples. I speculated that this was done to achieve a certain total, and having identified each part once with its number, Bessler then sought to add to the total by labelling the same parts more than once. Obviously the higher numbers would make the jumps toward his desired total too big too quickly so he labelled everything once and having acquired a total, he added more of the smaller numbers until he had achieved his desired end. There are other peculiarities in the labelling and why this should have been done was unclear to me at the time.

There are discrepancies between the two drawings which I shall discuss in a later post but for now be aware that in the first drawing the numbers, composed from 59 numbers, add up to 649 which is, interestingly, equal to 59 x 11 (both prime numbers).  In the second drawing the numbers add up to 633, which is 16 short of the 649.  In the second drawing the numbers 5 and one of the 11s has been omitted, which is why the second drawing does not match the 649 of the first drawing (NOTE 5 x 11 =55).  In both drawings the picture cuts off the left hand end of the drawing and in the process cuts off one of the number 11 weights.  If, in the first drawing, this is added to the 649 of the first drawing it produces the number 660, and because we then have 60 numbers, 660 divided by 60 equals 11, but more interestingly, 660 divided by 12 equals 55.  55 is a number we shall see many times during these posts.  This choice of the number twelve to introduce yet another example of the number 55, may seem too speculative, however, fascinating proof that it is the right assumption will appear in my next post

All the drawings in Das Triumphans contain similar number manipulations, the 'Andere Figura' and its companion, 'Secunda Figura', use the numbers from one to ten.  There is obviously a case of overlabelling in the right picture, with four number eights.



The numbers in the left picture add up to 28; those in the right, 62, to total 90.  There are 15 numbers used and 90 divided by 15 is six. This does not seem to be a significant number, however knowing that Bessler’s favourite number was 5, I realised that it divided 90 exactly 18 times – the ubiquitous pentagonal numbers again.  Secondly the numbers used, 1 to 10, add up to a total of 55 – the other Bessler number.
 

The wheel drawing containing the archimedes pump (see above) also uses overlabelling to achieve a specific number. One of the differences between this drawing and the other ones is the fact that in this one the parts are labelled with letters rather than numbers.  However there is one labelled part which is strangely ambiguous and that is the main supporting column which supports the wheel.  It looks like a ‘W’ however it can also be mistaken for the number ten, but this cannot be right because the other parts are labelled with letters.  The answer lies in the attached list of labelled parts; here the list is entirely in letters except for the last item which is undoubtedly labelled 10.  You can see the ambiguity in the expanded detail below, which has two examples of the number ‘10’, or the letter ‘W’.





Why then is the last item called item 10?  The solution seems obvious; the intention is that the reader should replace all the letters with numbers. The letters run from ‘A’ to T’, plus the letter/number 10.  Since 10 is the last item on the list one might suppose that it would represent the letter ‘U’ as ‘T’ was the last letter, but in fact it represents the letter ‘J’.  We know this for the simple reason that ’J’ is omitted from the list of parts and does not appear in the drawing.

 Bessler's use of the letter 'W' was often used as a way of implying the presence of the number ten, consisting as it does of two letter V's or Roman numerals to produce two more 5s.   He wrote it in the style shown below, which was taken from one of hos many handwritten examples.  The letter 'J' it replaces is the 10th letter of the alphabet.
There are 39 numbers, running from 1 to 20, totalling 355.  This does not seem significant until you discover that one of the letter ‘e’s representing the ropes which run around the spokes on the axle, has been omitted in the left side picture.  The one ‘e’ missing could, if replaced, increase the numbers to total 20 in each picture, and the total from 355, to 360.  360 divided by 20 eqals 18, our favourite pentagonal number again - of course 360 divided by the missing 5 equals 72, another pentagon number.


So the first drawings have 24 numbers, apart from an apparent hiccup over the number 24 getting transposed to number 42 which was deliberate, as I shall show in a later post.  The Andere figures use ten numbers, and the waterwheel uses 20.

There is so much more than these simple examples, but clearly there is a reason other than blinding us with mathematical mystification.  It has to be something useful to us for reconstruction his wheel.

JC

53 comments:

  1. Hello John. Your summary is enlightening and your number and letter code breaking in these figures seems consistent and reliable. There doesn't easily appear to be any other possibilities to explain what you found. I look forward to your future topics.

    I wonder about your statement "apart from an apparent hiccup over the number 24 getting transposed to number 48".

    Did you mean lock 24 being transposed into the number 42?

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    1. Thanks anon, typo corrected.

      JC

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    2. Welcome back John,
      there's an even bigger typo in the subject title !

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    3. Are you referring to the word 'numerics'? I thought it was a 'c', but it is an 'e'. Or is there another typo?ccand thanks for welcome back, Stevo!

      JC

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    4. Shouldn't there be an "H" in Triumphirende ?

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    5. Oops! Your so right Stevo - I don't know, my typing gets worse as I get older! Thanks mate.

      JC

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    6. John,
      if you was over here, there's so much US election coverage on TV, I could say you were suffering from an overdose of Trump, an forgot the "H". :-D

      Delete
  2. "For example the main pillar supporting the wheel is numbered 4, three times."

    With this clue Bessler is telling us that the vertical support plank of the Merseburg wheel was 12 inches wide since 4 + 4 + 4 = 12. On the left side profile illustration he only uses one 4 on the plank, but it doesn't stand for 4 inches. My measurements show the plank was only 3 inches thick.

    The slimmer vertical support boards for the pendulum pivot rod bearings were 4 inches x 3 inches based on my measurements. 4 x 3 = 12 and that's why he used the 12's on them.

    "In the second drawing the numbers add up to 633, which is 16 short of the 649."

    The number 16 was very important in the construction of the Merseburg wheel which was Bessler's first bidirectional wheel. According to the design I derived from other clues, there were 16 weighted levers in that wheel. 16 also happens to be the natural frequency of each of its pendulums! When those lower frequency pendulums were attached to a wheel turning at a much higher frequency, there was a big reduction in the running speed of the wheel due to inertial drag. This helped reduce the wear and tear on its internal components and allowed for a much longer run time before a repair would be needed.

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    1. Also, note the two 8's on the front pendulums of the Merseburg wheel. They sum to 16 and that's another clue that each of this wheel's pendulum's natural oscillation frequency was 16 opm.

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  3. I added some sound effects to my "Kassel Wheel Ride" sim mentioned in the last blog, but then discovered that they did not export when I converted it into an .avi file! But, despite that disappointment, I uploaded the new video to youtube this time and added some of their royalty-free music to it. I selected a classic German vocalization titled "Ich Grolle Nicht" or "I Bear No Grudge" and my video was just long enough to get the first line in which is "I bear no grudge, even though my heart is breaking." Somehow this seemed appropriate for Bessler considering how religious he was. The video is "new" because I got rid of the "meat hook" of the last video that lifts the 170 lb. man and replaced it with a hidden pin on the rim of the wheel that lifts him by his hand. Also, John, I put a link to this blog in the info section to help improve the traffic here and hope that's okay with you. The more visitors here, the better.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pK5Qr9Hlkhs

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    1. it sound good with germans music. heres guy whos vid shows stamps dropping but not as good as yours ken.


      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sr-5LlJM1ik


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  4. IMO, all we have to do is look to MT 24 for the solution of a true gravity powered wheel. All you have to do is offset the upper and lower weight in order to make the gravity wheel have an balance so that it continuously rotates. Does anyone disagree with this fact?

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  5. Correction, if MT-24 is the solution to a true gravity powered wheel, why hasn't anyone researched this drawing further? In my opinion, this particular drawing holds the true secret of Bessler's wheel. Does anyone disagree with this fact? If we can find a way to offset the upper and lower weight of this gravity wheel, should it not rotate continuously?

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    1. I hope, that I do not reveal here too much or same things that John plan to reveal!?
      I agree rather with MT 25, but also MT 24 is good shot, by it´s ... ! But there is some miss-leadings there. Plus there is not visible all actual mechanism. This can take also this way that double crossed V or W shows that V x V, should take 5 x 5 = 25. This mean drawing nr MT 25.
      There was too direct guess from that, next important drawing will be 5 x 5 x 5 = 125 then. So there is no drawing numbers anymore, starting from MT 105. Because of that some original drawings have changed their places and with that also to them "planned", original numbers. I have found this only afterwards.

      Eastlander

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    2. I've always liked MT 24 and it certainly looks like it would work. Your post motivated me to finally find out if it would. I made a quick WM2D model of the design Bessler provided and tried to make it as close as possible to his. I've uploaded a video of the simulation to youtube which you can find at the link below. Unfortunately, as the 10 second video shows, MT 24 is not a "runner". The wheel model I made is 3 feet in diameter and the dark gray weights are 1.5 lbs. each while the light gray ones are 0.5 lbs. each. All the model does is "keel". Wish I had better results to announce...

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SD-fJ-VoDCg&feature=youtu.be


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    3. "Plus there is not visible all actual mechanism"

      5 + 5 = 10 "The principle is good, but the figure is not yet complete until I _ indicate the correct handle-construction."

      John says W = 10

      5 + 5 + 5 = 15 "_ nothing of the prime mover's source can be seen or deduced although the figure shows the superior weight."

      5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 20 "_ I then reminded him to harness the horse in front."

      5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 = 25 "_ There is more to it than one might think. Mark my words."

      "But there is some miss-leadings there"

      "_ must not project so far out but must bend somewhat further inwardly".

      The weighted levers that fall cannot begin to move until well past 12 o'clock. When they do the iron poles can open or close (they are interconnected by a rope. The activated weighted lever past tdc will lose GPE (while it falls it no longer provides any torque and the wheel will have a tendency to turn CCW until it impacts its radial when it gives its momentum to the wheel). The weighted lever can not lift up more mass (the two sets of iron poles) than it has itself. Or more correctly as it loses height it must lose GPE at a greater amount than the two sets of poles gain combined GPE, otherwise things won't move at all.

      So it needs a shifting mechanism to get the action going on the ascending side before tdc is one option. The second one is that the weighted lever would be more effective in doing its job falling at 1.30 to 9 o'clock positions. There it loses the greatest initial GPE (vertical height loss) to overcome the lift GPE required.

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    4. Perpetualman _ In my opinion, this particular drawing holds the true secret of Bessler's wheel. If we can find a way to offset the upper and lower weight of this gravity wheel, should it not rotate continuously?

      What do you mean by "offset"?

      I don't understand what you are suggesting, it is not clear to me.

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    5. I do apologize for not making it clear. What I mean by offset is: the weight that's in the 12 O'clock position should shift itself to the right or left depending on which way it's turning. In fact, the swinging action of the weight should swing past tdc and remain on the descending side as the wheel rotates. Once it reaches the bdc, the weight would reset to the starting position to go around again and again.

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    6. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    7. Tdc = top dead centre, bdc = bottom dead centre.

      JC

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  6. I hope no one on this forum gets too agitated with my thoughts about MT24. It's just that, out of all the drawings that bessler made, this one holds merit IMO. I'm sure that John and many others on this site have poured over these drawings for many many hours and I hope some finally makes one work. But if this conversation that I started about this MT drawing gets annoying, please let me know and I'll leave it alone.....for now.

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    1. You sound like you did not yet take a look at the sim I made of MT 24 and uploaded to youtube which clearly shows that this design will not run as Bessler depicted it in MT. In making that sim I noticed that the weights that rise toward and away from the central hub (near the 6:00 and 12:00 positions of the wheel) will not even begin to move unless the weights at the ends of the long levers are about 3x as massive as them. Here's the link again:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SD-fJ-VoDCg&feature=youtu.be

      Anyway, based on that sim, I would not waste any time pursuing MT 24. You have to keep in mind that Bessler wrote that he left nothing in MT that showed the actual mechanics he found that worked. That material was removed, burned, and buried. Also, remember that he wrote that there was nothing attached to the axles of his wheels and he even allowed people to "grope" around inside of the drum and feel a wheel's axle to verify there was nothing hanging on it. He certainly would not have allowed that if the axle had four diametrical holes bored through it so that four connecting ropes could pass from one side of the axle to the other.

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    2. Thanks Ken, I did look at the Sim video and it looks really cool. By the way, how do you get a Sim video? I've been trying to find a program that I can use to create my own Sim video but i'm having a hard time locating a program that I can use to create my own.

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    3. @ Perpetualman: Glad you liked the sim of MT 24. It took me about 20 minutes to produce and upload to youtube. I mostly use Working Model 2D because it's the first one I started with and is very user friendly, but it has its limitations. Despite that, it's nearly perfect for making "flat" Bessler type wheel models.

      If you are new to making computer models and sims, then you might want to start with a free download of something like Algodoo. It's even easier to use than WM2D and has a few features WM2D doesn't have like realistic flowing water. Most of these sim programs let you export your model wheel as an .avi video file. ("Export" just means your sim program is converting the model's file type into a different file type that some other program can use and then saving the new file in a folder on your PC or laptop until you're ready to use it.) Once you've finished and tested your model wheel sim and exported it as an .avi video file to a folder on your computer, you can then quickly upload it to a site like photobucket or youtube so you can share it with others. I'm starting to prefer youtube as a host for these sim videos I make because, being owned by Google, that means the video is published immediately and, sometimes within hours, listed on their search engine so the whole world can watch it. Anyway, here's a link to a free download of Algodoo for Windows or Mac to get you started.

      http://www.algodoo.com/download/

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    4. Here's a short youtube video that will show you the different types of things you can do with Algodoo. It's really designed to teach physics and engineering to younger students, but it can certainly be used for modeling Bessler's wheels and will give one the basic skills needed to move on to more advanced sim software if he needs to.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xvAVQ6GEv-E

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    5. Well.....
      I'm sold on the VIDEO! That was absolutely amazing! That is exactly what I've been looking for. Thanks for sharing that with us Ken. I've come up with a weight shifting design for a gravity wheel but, I didn't have a way to test it other than spend money o build it.
      I've designed the wheel so that there's always more weight on the descending side than the ascending side. But all I need is way to put it into a sim and see if it will actually work.

      But I just thought of a question: is it possible that you can make everything work in a sim but when you actually build it, it doesn't work?

      How could you be absolutely sure that your actual wheel will work after you build it using the sim as a guide?

      I mean, can you actually build a working model out of wood after completing Sim video?

      What's your thoughts on this?

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    6. If you have a good sim program and your model is not too complex and you make a model that is as close to the real thing as possible, then I'd say that there's probably a 99% chance that a well made real physical model based on the sim model will work just like the sim. Although the results of simulation are a powerful predictive tool, they are only a bridge to a physical prototype and ultimate verification of the validity of any sim must depend upon the successful construction of a real model.

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    7. 10 points from 10 going to Algodoo, about easy of use.
      WM 2D ... I can give max 4 of 10 at the moment. Have tryed couple of weeks with all tutorials and tryed to figure out how and why ... But finally test time went over. Question to Ken, how quicly You draw and setup all features in WM 2D, example with same MT24 test setup?

      For avi recording good choice is CamStudio. But it needs some tweaking and testing, before you get good results. Search for "best settings", this helps a lot.

      Eastlander

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    8. "Question to Ken, how quicly You draw and setup all features in WM 2D, example with same MT24 test setup?"

      Once you install WM2D, you can make a wheel "template" which is just a model wheel that is, as in my research, exactly 3 feet in diameter. On that template, you adjust all of the conditions for your future wheel models such as units to be used (English or Metric), mass of the template wheel, default collision parameters (I prefer objects do not collide by default, but just pass by each other), air resistance (none by default), how the background will look, etc. That takes about 5 minutes. Then Save that model wheel template. Once that is done, you can then Open that template and install different weights, levers, ropes, springs, stops, etc. in your model wheel and then run it for how ever long you want (I usually loop the sim after, say, 10 seconds to minimize the amount of RAM it uses). Then, save what you have with a different file name (like "Bessler wheel model_001") so you can modify it later or convert it into an .avi file and upload it to a video host site like photobucket or youtube.

      That MT 24 model I posted on youtube took me about 20 minutes to produce. In my quest (successful!) to find "the" design Bessler used, I made around 1500 of these types of WM2D model wheels and studied their sims to see why they were not working and how I might correct them. Every change I made had to be one suggested by the DT portrait clues. Like all things, when you first start using any sim program, you'll be a bit confused and, perhaps, feel a little overwhelmed. But, with practice, that will soon pass. If anyone here downloads and installs Algodoo, they will find a "Crash Course" on it that will have him building his first sim model (a little car with a motorized wheel to propel it) in a matter of minutes. I've been playing around with the download I made and am still trying to see how I can upload a sim on youtube without having to use video capture software. They have their own website called AlgoBox for saving and sharing videos and you can save your models, which they call "scenes" there and share them with other members (they have about 50,000 scenes there already!). I've saved two scenes there so far, but still haven't found a way to go from there to youtube. I'll keep poking around with it, though.

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  7. wow ken i want to try tht algodoo to see if i can make wheel modles too. but for now heres someting for the magnet wheel buildeers to play with.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28U-jReqSCU

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  8. There was ineresting to hear John comment to "... You have to keep in mind that Bessler wrote that he left nothing in MT that showed the actual mechanics he found that worked. That material was removed, burned, and buried....". I think that Ken have forgot here, what are written in first page of MT.
    John, is there possible to give some pre information about You findings here. Again, without any exact details of it. Do You have found any other "codes" or "clues" from MT? If we left out here drawing nr 55, do You reveal some other important information about some other MT drawing(s)?
    From my afterfindings ... In MT is main information about how all was build up. But, ....SIMPLE key to this is in AP. Again, all simplicity is visible only afterwards.

    Eastlander

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    1. This is merely my opinion, but for me MT does contain much useful information, although I have found support in some drawings for pieces of coded information I have deciphered elsewhere.

      JC

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    2. Incredibly, the working design I found for Bessler's secret wheel mechanics is actually a combination of MT 10 and MT 18. But, combining them requires specially shaped levers and an intricate system of coordinating cords. I'll be giving all of the details in my forthcoming Bessler book!

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    3. Another typo! I omitted the word "not" in the above comment. MT has not given me much information towards a design.

      JC

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  9. Ken, so you're now saying you have a working design? Are you stretching the truth a bit here?

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    1. At this point I have a working design in simulation form only. However, I've done everything I can to eliminate the possibility of it being due to faulty construction on my part or a glitch in WM2D and am convinced that the sim is 100% valid. In my book I'll be giving very detailed instructions, based upon my interpretations of the many construction parameters encoded into the two DT portraits, to construct Bessler's 3 foot diameter Gera prototype wheel since this will be the easiest project for the person with average crafting skills to tackle. But, for the more skilled craftsmen, there will also be all of the parameters, in table form, needed to scale this toy wheel up to working versions of the Merseburg and Kassel wheels. I'm even planning to provide the parameters for the other wheels he completed at Karlshafen and his proposed, but never constructed, "super wheel" that would have been about 40 feet in diameter and able to output thousands of watts of mechanical power. In short, this will be the ultimate Bessler book and is intended to, finally, solve this 300 year old mystery as well as propel the serious student of the subject to the next level of Bessler research: a sublime state I refer to as "Total Bessler Awareness" (I also once referred to it as "Full Bessler Consciousness") wherein the pm chaser finally understands all of the details of Bessler's secret pm wheel mechanics and how to apply them. Right now I'm working my way through Chapter 7 in which I provide detailed schematics for the novel gravity activated latching system that allowed his 12 foot diameter wheels to be two-directional. I'm confident that this volume will become a "classic" work in the field of "self-motive" machinery and, shortly, after its publication, we'll see working replicas of Bessler's wheels appearing all over the world!

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    2. Thank you for that reply. I am going to file it under a heading I will refer to as, "Total BS", which doesn't require any level of conciousness, sublime or otherwise.

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    3. Hello Ken, I just wanted to say that I had made a little error in my last post. When I said that MT 24 is where we should be looking, I meant MT 21. I've always liked this particular drawing because it seems that there could be a way to get more weight or at least one more weight on the descending side then the ascending the side.

      What do you think about that particular drawing, that is, MT 21?

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    4. @Perpetualman: Unfortunately, MT 21 is yet another non-runner from MT. Here's an excellent 3D model someone made of it. Note that he only manages to get some rotation out of it by removing one of the ascending side weights, indicated by the red "x" that suddenly appears. Even then it soon keels.


      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_q9sDatCCw


      @Anonymous: I'm sure you believe it must be "Total BS" and my response to that is that your opinion would quickly change if you could see what I've got in the volume so far. Right now everyone thinks they know as much as possible about Bessler's wheels and, with that limited information, it's just not enough to solve the mystery. My book will show them how very wrong they are! What I intend to publish is nothing short of the most important book on Bessler in the last 3 centuries! As such, I expect it to quickly start a firestorm of controversy, but, when the smoke finally clears, it will lead to the successful duplication of Bessler's wheels and his vindication as an honest man.

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    5. "What I intend to publish is nothing short of the most important book on Bessler in the last 3 centuries!"
      I don't know how you have the nerve to come on John's blog with comments like that, when you know it's also John's intention to publish his own work. I think you need to reign yourself in a bit.

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  10. if flywheel do this in toy what it do in a besslers wheels?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NFXOlQcp6s

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  11. Hey Ken, what if the weights on MT 21 were changed? I mean, what if they were made differently in shape and size and swung differently?

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    1. I don't think changing the weights would make any difference. The problem with MT 21 is that the center of gravity of the weights, upon release of the wheel, just drops to a point below the axle, the "punctum quietus", and then the axle torque drops to zero. The angular momentum accumulated in the wheel during that drop will carry the center of gravity a bit over onto the ascending side of the axle and make it rise a little, but the wheel will always stop just before the rising weighted lever on the ascending side has time to flip over to its right so its end weight will land on one of the hub's paddles and the center of gravity will then just oscillate back and forth until air drag brings it to a stop at the punctum quietus. One is then obliged to supply some extra torque to the axle and energy to the wheel to turn it clockwise enough to make that weight finally fall over and, again, momentarily put the center of gravity a little way onto the descending side of the axle and above the elevation of the punctum quietus. Practically all of the wheel designs in MT suffer from this problem which is why they are non-runners. Their centers of gravity "fall" into a gravitational potential energy well at the punctum quietus below the axle and can not manage to climb out of it again to achieve continuous motion. In the successful design that Bessler eventually found, the location of that "well" is actually displaced onto a wheel's descending side and, more importantly, stays there during wheel rotation! That, of course, provides a continuous torque on the successful design's axle which will accelerate a wheel and perform outside work. The wheel's torque, however, will slowly decrease as wheel rotation rate increases because the increase in centrifugal forces acting on its weighted levers interferes with their smooth shifting. But, that's actually a good thing, because it prevents the drum from eventually being torn apart by those centrifugal forces.

      In looking at MT 21 I'm convinced that it is the design Frank Edwards was referring to in his fictional account of Bessler that appeared in a chapter of his 1956 book, "Stranger Than Science", that was titled "Bessler's Wonderful Wheel". The description Edwards gives is:

      "The secret, if there was a secret, lay in the ingenious manner in which the weights on the ascending side of the wheel were prevented from following their normal path next to the rim. Count Karl said that these weights were blocked by small pegs which swung back out of the way as the weight passed the zenith."

      I'm almost tempted to say that Edwards had seen MT 21 when he wrote that, but that's highly unlikely. He just guessed at a design to make his chapter more interesting and then attributed it to a description written down by Karl to which the reader gets the impression that Edwards later, somehow, got access. Anyway, you can read Edwards' full chapter at the link below. It's a mixture of some fact with a lot of fiction, but still makes entertaining reading and probably motivated many young people in the late '50's to become pm chasers. During the '60's there were only three authors I was aware of that were even discussing Bessler and his wheels: Dircks, Gould, and Edwards. Now, of course, there are, thanks to John's efforts, many more discussing him!

      http://www.keelynet.com/energy/bessler.htm

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    2. Hello Ken,

      I just read the keelynet page you referred me to. Very good info! And thank you for input on MT 21. As I looked upon some of Bessler's drawings, I see a distinct pattern with the letter A. It appears to me that what ever part of a drawing the letter A is next to, the drawing has a specific shape to it.

      That's just my own opinion. I'm others on this site would either agree or disagree.

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  12. here is another guy with bessler whell soltuion

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYzVwdbFh-U

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  13. "What I intend to publish is nothing short of the most important book on Bessler in the last 3 centuries!"
    I don't know how you have the nerve to come on John's blog with comments like that, when you know it's also John's intention to publish his own work. I think you need to reign yourself in a bit.

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    1. Thank you,anonymous! I was just going to remind Ken, "keep your posts short and infrequent please"' as we agreed.

      JC

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    2. I have no problem with John or anyone else claiming to have found the secret of Bessler's wheels and I look forward to seeing what they've found and will gladly help them evaluate it if they wish. But, the ultimate test of the matter is whether that discovery will lead to a physical duplication of his wheels which have their same performance characteristics. I am very highly confident that what I've found will lead to such a replication. Soon the world will know of its details.

      Sorry, John, if I seem to be overdoing it a bit here. Just responding to the questions of others. I'll try to "reign myself in a bit".

      Above I stated that the working design I found for Bessler's wheels is a combination of MT 10 and MT 18 that uses specially shaped levers and an intricate system of coordinating cords. Here's yet another clue that I'm right. If you divide 10 by 18 you get an infinite string of Bessler's favorite number because 10/18 =

      0.555555555555555555555555555555555555555555555555555555555555555...

      This could, of course, just be coincidence, but I don't think so!

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    3. Ken, please give here very, very short (by your mean) answer to next question. I know that you can do so:
      How many days/weeks you have run your "working simulation"? No any extra specific explanation needed here, as you ordinary like to describe - how and why, just some numbers is more then enough now? Show to us all that you can answer also shortly here. Give out just some number for answer.
      Maybe there will be future questions ... depend on this answers ... length!

      Eastlander

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    4. My simulation can be run until it's thousands of separate computed frames fill up the available memory in a computer. Right now I have 4 GB of ram in a Toshiba laptop I use and only about 3.6 GB of it is available to store sim frames (I used sims with 40 frames per second of model motion). That's only enough to allow the simulation to show a few full wheel rotations at most before the available memory is used up or "maxed out". But, if a sim can make it that far, show steady acceleration, and there are no glitches involved, then it's most likely a "runner". Still, however, complete verification must await physical construction. I am very confident that will happen shortly after the publication of my "ultimate" Bessler book!

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  14. Come on guys! surely by now you have realized that none of these codes, pentagrams or diagrams is ever going to come near to solving this!
    The only way is the hands-on approach, using the secret principle which is quite simple but very deep.
    It is deep because it has five mechanical facets that compliment each other.
    Once you have it, the rest is routine.

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Climate Change and Bessler's Wheel

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