Saturday, 21 April 2012

No wheels exist in nature.

Throughout history, most inventions were inspired by the natural world. The idea for the pitchfork and table fork came from forked sticks; the aeroplane from gliding birds. But the wheel is a one hundred percent homo sapien innovation. As Michael LaBarbera—a professor of biology and anatomy at the University of Chicago—wrote in a 1983 issue of  "The American Naturalist", 'only bacterial flagella, dung beetles and tumbleweeds come close. And even they are “wheeled organisms” in the loosest use of the term, since they use rolling as a form of locomotion'.

Thanks to the Smithsonian, there's a lot more there. -

The Ouroboros is an ancient symbol depicting a serpent or dragon eating its own tail.  There is an ongoing hoax about the hoop snake which is supposed to exhibit similar propensities.  It is reputed to be able form itself into a hoop and roll after its prey at speeds up to 60 miles an hour! They can alter their shapes as they go, and even roll up hill.  This reminds me of Fletcher's post on the besslerwheel forum about suggesting to Bessler that he tried out that idea with his own wheel to see if it would roll uphill.

JC

27 comments:

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  2. You maybe right but as I'm stopping the wheel building in a few weeks once the latest one has been completed, I thought this would be a suitable time to publish my ideas.

    Jc

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  3. Chris, imagine for a moment that I discover the solution for the human starving, it would be easy, cheap, and it will satisfy all humans in the world. And I show up in the humanitarian web pages boasting I know how to solve it, but I will not tell anyone, I just want all people to know I have the solution.
    So if your attitude is like this and you really have something, then at this point it does not matter if you know how the wheel works.
    Reflect yourself.

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    1. This is how it goes with people in general ... tell all or you are nothing to us . You are insignificant unless you can either make things up to entertain us or give us the information that you have for nothing . I have a message for you : " Charity begins at home . "

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    2. The above reply is from chris.

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    1. How come you never share any of your wheel ideas? YOUR light in the tunnel is on low beam sir!

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    2. Appropriate quote from Bessler to be found in AP :"It's true that nowadays in many places there are to be found socalled
      "Wheel-makers". Everyone can claim to be an inventor;
      anyone who can do a bit of cobbling. Art and skill no longer count
      for much, but the rewards are claimed willy nilly! The true
      inventor must graft away endlessly, and get his hands sore! Only
      then will he achieve anything worthwhile, as I did many years
      ago, but unfortunately skill such as that of Orpheus, on his lyre of
      old, is held in scant regard today. I wish people would plough
      their own furrows, for that way they will remain free of care. My
      well-worn slogan shall be: - "Wish for others what you wish for
      yourself."

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    3. Above , chris again.

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    5. Just trying to keep comments in their context with each other, so the conversation doesn't become even more of a convoluted series of unrelated retorts anymore than it already does.

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    1. Less wind in the writing space and more ideas please sir.

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    2. Do you have any ideas to share anonymous?

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  6. JC wrote:

    "But the wheel is a one hundred percent homo sapien innovation."

    If you are referring to a wheel mounted on a fixed axle of some sort, then, yes, that is a human invention. BUT, rolling wheels ARE certainly found in Nature such as falling tree trunks and rounded boulders that roll down the sides of mountains. Even organisms can demonstrate this type of rolling action. My friend has a very chubby little dog, a Dashund, that, upon command, will pull his legs in and roll at a fairly fast speed from one end of the living room to the other! I think he actually rolls faster than he can walk or run! Other natural "unmounted" wheels that spin rather than roll are such things as disc shaped galaxies, solar systems, and the electronic orbits in atoms.

    Yes, Bessler's wheels, if unmounted, could be made to roll uphill. However, considering their low power output and heavy mass, it would have to be a hill with a VERY gentle slope!

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    1. Speculation. It wasn't done, so we'll never know whether it could have rolled uphill or not, so it has no relevance.

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  7. Quote from Chris Wilson from above:

    For this reason I find myself annoyed to say the least at all the (im)posters who pretend to "know" how the device worked



    Quote from Cris Wilson from overunity.com:


    Quote:
    Nobody in my family nor my friends have disowned me for claiming that I have discovered Bessler's principle at least 100 times ! but these online communities have .


    Just wanted everyone to know who you are talking to! Have a great day.

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    2. More "windy fruit" from the keyboard of Chris! Why not just add a "t" to your name and bless your vain writings?

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  8. That's right anonymous. No one knows! If they did, John's blog would be much different.

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  10. That's just it, Chris, "IF bessler's wheel was more than a mirage", we don't know.

    Good luck to you.

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  11. Doug wrote:

    "No one knows! If they did, John's blog would be much different."

    Well, I only claim to know about 95% of how Bessler's wheels worked and I do think that posting my "little tid bits here and there" IS making a difference...at least to the serious, ACTIVE Bessler researchers out there in PM land. I believe those lurkers ARE taking my hints VERY seriously!

    For the last decade or so with the rise of the modern internet, many have come forth claiming to "know" the secret of Bessler's wheels. What they really meant was that they were confident that their approach would work IF it was built or improved upon. Unfortunately, Confidence does NOT equal Reality when it comes to the quest to achieve a WORKING OB PM gravity wheel. Most of those who made those claims are never heard from again because they're off chasing some other passing interest or, if they maintain an interest in PM, pop up later with a different pseudonym and yet ANOTHER PM design that they "know" will work.

    I will not KNOW, for a fact, that "my" approach to Bessler wheel mechanics WILL work (although it is based TOTALLY upon the clues HE left and MY interpretations of them) until I actually find that remaining 5% that separates me from reaching the end of the "right track" that I am currently on. When I have that (assuming that I am the first to do it!), then I will have 100% of the mystery solved and will be at the end of the "right track" with either a working physical model or a simulation. In the meantime, I will continue to drop those "tid bits" every once in a while with the hope of getting as many onto the "right track" with me and a VERY few others as possible. If only 1 in 100 of those reading my comments switches onto the "right track", then I will be satisfied.

    You also wrote: "It wasn't done, so we'll never know whether it [Bessler's wheel] could have rolled uphill or not, so it has no relevance."

    Well, it really comes down to a matter of whether Bessler's wheels could have lifted their own weight against the pull of gravity. If one of Bessler's wheels had been mounted inside of a movable frame, then it would have been possible, regardless of the mass of the wheel and frame, to lift all of it by using the power output of the wheel with a suitably sized block and tackle. However, with such a low power output and a total mass of hundreds of pounds to lift (the sum of the masses of the wheel and its movable frame), one would have to have the "mother" of all block and tackles attached between the wheel's frame, an overhead ceiling beam, and the wheel's axle to do the job. I estimate that if such a configuration was used to lift the Weissenstein wheel, it would only be able to lift it about a foot per minute. Not really that dramatic which is why Bessler never did it, but it COULD be done. He probably didn't want to risk having his elevating wheel suddenly crash to the floor, its drum then break open, and the secret mechanism of its internal mechanics laid bare for every witness present to see and then quickly sketch so they could send off drawings to all of his rival mobilists!

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  13. Publish nothing,build the device with your engineer first,run it for couple of month's, like Bessler did,show it,and worry about the rest later.

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  14. @ Chris

    Publication is certainly an excellent way to establish priority to an invention. BUT, once you do that, the design is "in the public domain" and can not be patented by anyone, including YOU, at some later date. However, IF you are unconcerned about patenting as I am, then publication is the way to go. As JC suggested, though, it would be nice if you had a WORKING physical prototype or at least a glitch free WORKING simulation of the design first so that when others try to replicate it, their versions will also work. Without those, your published design will just add to growing pile of POSSIBLE designs that currently litter the internet. Like those, it will eventually be dismissed and forgotten.

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